Just had a short break away from the constant pace of previous work – 16 months’ worth of near-daily updates – in which I caught up on the stack of magazines, articles, books I’d been meaning to get through. So away from tech for a while hence no blog post last month.

The book stack never goes down – see Michael Simmons’ article at https://medium.com/accelerated-intelligence/the-5-hour-rule-if-youre-not-spending-5-hours-per-week-learning-you-re-being-irresponsible-791c3f18f5e6 – if I could take a yearly two-week reading vacation, I would… but back in the real world..

Now I’m ready to start on Parachute 0.0.2, the rework of the node server protocol to be iserver compatible. This should mean that the emulator could work with other emulators’ iservers, and vice-versa. However, the link emulation mechanism would need additional variants, to use the mechanism used by other emulators – e.g. http://lcm-proj.github.io/ as used by Gavin Crate’s emulator (see https://sites.google.com/site/transputeremulator/Home/multiprocessor-jserver-support).

During this work, I’ll update the Hello World assembly program, and start upgrading the C++ code to C++11 as needed.

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16 months after picking up this old project, I’m happy to release the first cross-platform version of my T800ish Transputer Emulator!

See the Parachute 0.0.1 release notice for more details, download links etc.

As the previous blog post here described, there have been several frustrating aspects to the development- and these have only continued since then. However, I now have a good base, with mostly fully automated build/test and release systems- so subsequent releases should be easier.

One aspect of the build has been to use Maven & Jenkins for everything- despite several components of Parachute not being pure Java. Between these two, and a moderate collection of plugins, I have a multi-platform C++ build, with deployment to Maven Central.

I have a long-standing dislike of language ecosystems building their own component build/dependency/deployment systems. They re-invent Maven – sometimes poorly, usually because of a mistaken idea that it is Java-only. I’d much rather build on the existing base of Maven than see my language experiments as in some way “special”, requiring me to unnecessarily re-invent it. Maven is not perfect, but I think it’s a good fit for Parachute. I’ll still be providing build tools as command line tools and libraries, for easy use in non-Maven systems.

In the next phase of Parachute I’ll be converting the protocol between the emulator and host I/O server to be compatible with the Inmos iServer, then getting eForth working.

But first, a rest. Happy Summer Solstice!

TL;DR: Frustration, but the end is in sight.

Parachute is composed of several separate projects, with independent versions, held in separate repositories:

  • the Transputer Emulator itself, written in C++, built using Maven/CMake/Make, which requires building and packaging on macOS, CentOS 7, Ubuntu 1604 and 1804, Raspbian Stretch, and Windows 10.
  • the Transputer Macro assembler, written in Scala, built using Maven, which requires building and packaging on macOS, Linux (one cross-platform build for all the above Linux variants), and Windows 10.
  • and eventually there will be the eForth build for Transputer, other languages, documentation, etc.

Getting all this to build has been quite the journey!

I use Maven as an overall build tool, since it gives me sane version management, build capability for all the languages I use via plugins, packaging, signing, deployment to a central repository (I’m serving all build artefacts via Maven Central).

Each project’s build runs across a set of Jenkins instances, with the master on macOS, and nodes on virtual machines, and a physical Raspberry Pi.

Each project deploys a single artefact per target OS, into Maven Central’s staging repository. So there are six build jobs, one on each node, that can sign and deploy on request.

The effect of this is that a single commit can trigger six build jobs for the C++ code, and three for the JVM-based code (since all Linux systems package the same scripts). Deployment is manually chosen at convenient points, with manual closing of the staging repository in Sonatype’s OSSRH service.

The manual deployment choices may be removed once all this is running smoothly. Since I cannot produce all platform-specific artefacts from a single Maven build, I cannot use the Maven Release Plugin.

Once the emulator and assembler are deployed for all their variants, there is a final build job that composes the Parachute distribution archives, signs them and deploys them to Maven Central via Sonatype OSSRH.

There have been several ‘gotchas’ along the way..

… the GPG signing plugin does not like being run on Jenkins nodes. It gets the config from the master (notably, the GPG home, from which it builds its paths to the various key files). So that had to be parameterised per-node.

… getting the latest build environments for C++ on each of the nodes. I’m not using a single version of a single compiler on everything. A variety of clangs (from 3.5.0 to 8.0.0) and Microsoft Visual C++ Build Tools.

… Windows. It’s just a world of pain. Everything has to be different.

So this long ‘phase one’ is almost at an end, and I hope to ship the first build very soon.

It would be ‘fun’ to see if I can replicate all the above with a cloud-based build system instead of Jenkins + VMs. However, Windows, macOS and Raspberry Pi will be problematic. Travis CI does not have CentOS or Raspberry Pi hosts; Circle CI does not have Windows, CentOS or Raspberry Pi hosts (Windows is on their roadmap).

Surely, there’s something to report this month?

Well Parachute is making progress, I now have a version that runs on Windows 10, with some small niggles. It’s building on macOS, Windows 10, CentOS 7 and Ubuntu 1604. Now working on the final packaging builds that’ll bring together the emulator, assembler, example program (which is the essential ‘Hello World’ in assembler) and eForth into a single distributable package for each platform.

I’m also starting to read up on theory relating to the Transputer, occam, and the process algebra it’s based on, Communicating Sequential Processes. More on this (a series of rough notes on the papers and books I’m reading) later.

The magnetic loop is still waiting for me to work out how to do brazing, to connect the copper pipe loop to the variable capacitor in a manner that keeps resistance to a minumum.

The digital modes transceiver keeps knocking around in my head, although I did find an archived copy of the Elektor issue that describes the LUFA library. It’s http://d1.ourdev.cn/bbs_upload782111/files_43/ourdev_663216L8BOSE.pdf

In terms of goals, my CW goal is utterly shot. I’m still keeping up with the Bulgarian Station Blagovestnik’s special event stations – I’ve managed to contact all of them so far, including this month’s via some extremely shaky CW (I must pick up CW practice again.)

I have various other fitness/study goals (abstract algebra, category theory, stoicism) and commitments that are noodling along slowly… but finding time is always the difficult bit.

One thing that’s being stuck at solidly is meditation: I’m making time for it every day (with a couple of unavoidable exceptions). As Voltaire said, “The more you read without thinking, the more you think you know a lot but the more you meditate, the more you see that you know very little.”

I know so very, very little.

If you need to visualise molecular structures, RasMol is a venerable program that should run on multiple platforms. I was recently asked to help getting it working on modern Mac OSX. There are instructions on the RasMol website, but not for modern Mac OSX. Hence, these rough notes – offered in the hope they may help others…

RasMol uses the older X11 windowing system that is no longer provided as part of macOS, so we’ll install the open source XQuartz X11 system from XQuartz.org.
Download the .dmg (disk image file), open it, and run the installer. You’ll then need to log out and log in.

Then download RasMol from its SourceForge download area. You’ll need the file:
RasMol_2_7_5_3_i86_64_OSX_High_Sierra_19Dec18.tar.gz.

Once this has downloaded (into your Downloads folder), you’ll need to open a Terminal, and extract its contents, with the following commands. Note that MyMacBook$ is the prompt provided by the Terminal/OS:


MyMacBook$ cd Downloads
MyMacBook$ tar xzvf RasMol_2_7_5_3_i86_64_OSX_High_Sierra_19Dec18.tar.gz
(Many lines will scroll by)

We’ll put this extracted software somewhere a bit easier to get to:

MyMacBook$ mv RasMol_2_7_5_3_i86_64_OSX_High_Sierra_19Dec18 ~/Applications/RasMol_2_7_5_3

(Now it’s in your personal Applications folder).

We need a launch script, since the one that comes with the software doesn’t seem to work, since it can’t find XQuartz’s libraries. So from the terminal:

MyMacBook$ cd ~/Applciations/RasMol_2_7_5_3
MyMacBook$ nano run-rasmol.sh

This puts you into the ‘nano’ text editor, then you must copy and paste:


#/bin/bash
export DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH=$DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH:/opt/X11/lib
./rasmol_XFORMS_32BIT

Then press Control-X, and press Y then return to save the file. Then:


MyMacBook$ chmod 755 run-rasmol.sh

OK, nearly there.

Only kidding 🙂

Let’s create an alias to let you run RasMol…


MyMacBook$ cd (then press return)
MyMacBook$ nano .bashrc

Again, you’re in the nano editor, so copy and paste this:


#!/bin/bash
alias rasmol='cd ~/Applications/RasMol_2_7_5_3; ./run-rasmol.sh'

Then Control-X, and Y then return to save the file.

Righty, let’s run XQuartz (via spotlight [Command-Space]). After a few seconds, you’ll see an X11 terminal window (xterm) appear. This is different from the usual Mac Terminal. You won’t be able to run RasMol from the Mac Terminal: you must use XQuartz and in the xterm, type:


bash-3.2$ rasmol (then press return)

Then you’ll see the beautiful RasMol window. It’s very different from what you’re used to on macOS, but this is how we used to use graphical programs back in the 80s.

The main RasMol window has its own menu – it’s not in the top menu bar like ‘normal’ Mac programs.

When you close XQuartz, you close ALL the X11 programs you’re running – xterm, rasmol, etc.

To open a file in RasMol, use the File menu, then Open…, then use the old-style file dialog to navigate using the ‘..’ (Parent Folder) directories to find where you’ve stored your RasMol files.

Back in July 2017 I wrote a post on here in which I gave a rough sketch of a combination transceiver/computer that would allow me to take a single unit, antenna kit and power, and work digital modes portably, with a minimum amount of baggage. Like one might do with the Mountain Topper range of CW transceivers, but capable of operating with digital modes.

When I wrote the article, I was into JT65 and JT9. Now of course, FT8 is the mode du jour.

The DDS of choice was the ‘el cheapo’ AD9850/AD9851 boards that are available on eBay: now I’d go for the Si5351 DDS boards, with a module available from Adafruit, and also available in an ‘el cheapo’ variant! This DDS creates fewer harmonics.

I’m still very much a beginner at RF design: that is still the major risk to the project, as is the absence of copious amounts of spare time in which to work on it!

However, one risk I’d identified – making an Arduino present itself as a sound card + multiple serial devices – seems to be reducible. LUFA (Lightweight USB Framework for AVRs is a “an open-source complete USB stack for the USB-enabled Atmel AVR8 and (some of the) AVR32 microcontroller series, released under the permissive MIT License”. It has examples of Audio In/Out and Serial devices. I’m hoping it can also provide a composite device that allows the single audio I/O channel, and two serial ports (diagnostic and CAT control).

So the next action on this project is to make an Arduino Micro look like a sound card with two serial ports. It’ll be a loopback device, so whatever sound you play at it (i.e. when transmitting) will be played back to you when receiving; whatever you send on serial port A will be echoed back to you with a ‘DIAG’ prepended to it; similarly with port B as the ‘CAT’ port.

Still unknown: SSB transceiver design that’s buildable by a beginner, and that can be connected into a ADC / DAC pair. How many bits of audio do I need to sample, at what rate?

This may well require a microcontroller that’s a bit more powerful than my usual Arduino Micro – possibly one from the Teensy range.

… to be continued…

Since Feb/Mar 2018, I’ve been working on a new phase of one of my old projects: Parachute, a modern toolchain for programming the Transputer, and a Transputer Emulator – cross-platform for Mac OSX, Windows 10 and Linux.

The Transputer architecture is interesting since it was one of the first microprocessors to support multitasking in silicon without needing an operating system to handle task switching. Its high level language, occam, was designed to facilitate safe concurrent programming. Conventional languages do not easily represent highly concurrent programs as their design assumes sequential execution. Java has a memory model and some facilities (monitors, locks, etc.) to make parallel programming possible, but is not inherently concurrent, and reasoning about concurrent code in Java is hard. occam was the first language to be designed to explicitly support concurrent (in addition to sequential) execution, automatically providing communication and synchronisation between concurrent processes. If you’ve used go, you’ll find occam familiar: it’s based on the same foundation.

My first goal is to get a version of eForth running on my emulator (as I’ve long wanted to understand Forth’s internals). The eForth that exists is a) untested by its author and b) only buildable on MASM 6, which is hard to obtain (legally). I’m trying to make this project as open and cross-platform as possible, so first I had to write a MASM-like macro assembler for the Transputer instruction set This is mostly done now, written in Scala, and just requires a little packaging work to run it on Mac OS X, Linux and Windows.

I’ve written up the history of this project at Parachute History, so won’t repeat myself here..

I’m not yet ready to release this, since it doesn’t build on Windows or Linux yet, and there are a few major elements missing. Getting it running on Windows will require a bit of porting; Linux should be a cinch.

Once I have a cross-platform build of the emulator, I intend to rewrite my host interface to be compatible with the standard iServer (what I have now is a homebrew experimental ‘getting started’ server).

There are quite a few instructions missing from my emulator – mostly the floating point subset, which will be a major undertaking.

The emulator handles all the instructions needed by eForth. eForth itself will need its I/O code modifying to work with an iServer.

Once eForth is running, I have plans for higher-level languages targetting the Transputer…

… but what I have now is:

… to be continued!