In part 2 of this series, I described the construction of the HF antenna analyser project I’m building, from Beric Dunn’s schematics and Arduino firmware. In this article, I’ll finish some small items of construction, and look at testing and driving the analyser. All resources, pictures and files for this project are available from the project GitHub repository, with driver software available from the driver GitHub repository.

Errata

The Scan LED wasn’t working, and this was because R12 was too large, so I replaced it with a 1K Ohm. Sorted. Also, the SIL headers I’d ordered originally were too small for the pins of the Arduino Micro and DDS module. It took some time to locate suitable replacements, and find a supplier who wasn’t going to charge me £4.95 just for placing an order as a private (hobbyist) customer. Fortunately, I discovered Proto-Pic, a UK supplier that could provide 10-pin and 6-pin SIL headers. I ordered 2×10 pin Stackable Arduino Headers (PPPRT-11376) and 6×6 pin Stackable Arduino Headers (PPPRT-09280) for £4.78 including P&P. When fitting the 6-pin headers for the Arduino Micro (three per side), you may find that they are quite tight together, so sand down the inner edges a little. The Arduino Micro was still quite a tight fit, but it’s far more secure than it was.

Boxing it up

I cut a few more tracks on the veroboard near the mounting holes so that the metal spacers and screws I found in my spares box wouldn’t short anything out, then started fitting the board into the enclosure, cutting holes as appropriate. I added a switch into the power line… the result looks like this:

And when the LetraSet goes on:

Software, Firmware

I’ve made a few changes to Beric’s original firmware (see here), but will keep the commands and output format compatible, so if you’re driving my modified firmware with Beric’s Windows driver, everything should still work.

I use Windows 2000 on an old laptop in the Shack: I couldn’t get it working with the Arduino drivers, so I couldn’t use Beric’s Windows driver software. I needed a Linux or Mac OSX solution, so started writing a Scala GUI driver that would run on Mac, Windows or Linux, and have got this to the point where I need to add serial drivers like RxTx, getting the native libraries packaged, etc., etc.

However, that’s on hold, since I was contacted by Simon Kennedy G0FCU, who reports that he’s built an analyser from my layout which worked first time!! He’s running on Linux, and has passed the transformed scan output into gnuplot to yield a nice graph. I hadn’t considered gnuplot, and the results look far better than I could write quickly.

So, I reused the code I wrote several years ago for serial line/data monitoring, and wrote an analyser driver in C that produces nice graphs via gnuplot. So far it builds on Mac OSX. In the near future I’ll provide downloadable packages for Debian/Ubuntu/Mint, Red Hat/CentOS and hopefully Raspberry Pi.

Testing

The analyser as it stands is not without problems – the first frequency set during a scan usually reports a very high SWR – I don’t think the setting of the DDS frequency after a reset is working reliably. From looking at the DDS data sheet timing diagrams, short delays are needed after resetting, and updating the frequency – these are not in the current firmware…

Also repeated scans tend to show quite different plots – however, there are points in these repeated plots that are similar, hopefully indicating the resonant frequencies.

Beric mentioned (on the k6bez_projects Yahoo! group) that “With the low powers being used, and the germanium diodes being used, it makes sense to take the square of the detected voltages before calculating the VSWR.”…

Simon pointed out that “the variable VSWR is defined as a double. This means that when REV >= FWD and VSWR is set to 999 it causes an overflow in the println command that multiplies VSWR by 1000 and turns it into an int. Making VSWR a long should fix this.” He also suggested some other changes to the VSWR calculation…

… these are changes I’m testing, and hope to commit soon.

I’ll add some options to the software/firmware to plot the detector voltages over time for a few seconds – an oscilloscope probing the FWD/REV detector output shows some digital noise. I had added an LED-fading effect to show that the board is active, and this exacerbates the noise. This noise makes it through to the VSWR measurement. I’ll try taking the mode of several measurements… Once the DDS is generating the relevant frequency, I’m expecting these voltages to be perfectly stable.

I’m investigating these issues, and hope to resolve them in software/firmware – I hope no changes are needed to the hardware to fix the problems I’m seeing, but can’t rule out shielding the DDS, and/or using shielded cable for the FWD/REV connections between the op-amp and Arduino Micro.

In the next article, I’ll show how to drive the analyser with the driver software, and hopefully resolve the noise issue.

Will M0CUV actually find the resonant frequency of his loft-based 20m dog-leg dipole made from speaker wire? Will the analyser show the tight bandwidth of the 80m loop? Stay tuned! (groan)

73 de Matt M0CUV

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